fiebre:

This boy is the son of a tribal King of the Tifini Tribe, in Benin. The scarifications show to which tribes he belongs and from which region he is.
Benin 2014 - by Ingetje Tadros

fiebre:

This boy is the son of a tribal King of the Tifini Tribe, in Benin. The scarifications show to which tribes he belongs and from which region he is.

Benin 2014 - by Ingetje Tadros

Reblogged from aquaticwonder with 1,557 notes

statikgodsson:

Carvaggio

statikgodsson:

Carvaggio

Reblogged from eternaldrone with 367 notes

(Source: victorian-castle-keeper)

Reblogged from ancient-serpent with 286 notes

paxmachina:

Onna Bugeisha (Feudal Japan Female Samurai)

Rare vintage photograph of an Onna-Bugeisha, one of the female warriors of the upper social classes in feudal Japan (emerged before Samurai)
An onna-bugeisha (女武芸者?) was a type of female warrior belonging to the Japanese upper class. Many wives, widows, daughters, and rebels answered the call of duty by engaging in battle, commonly alongside samurai men. They were members of the bushi (samurai) class in feudal Japan and were trained in the use of weapons to protect their household, family, and honor in times of war. They also represented a divergence from the traditional “housewife” role of the Japanese woman. They are sometimes mistakenly referred to as female samurai, although this is an oversimplification. Onna bugeisha were very important people in ancient Japan. Significant icons such as Empress Jingu, Tomoe Gozen, Nakano Takeko, and Hōjō Masako were all onna bugeisha who came to have a significant impact on Japan.

paxmachina:

Onna Bugeisha (Feudal Japan Female Samurai)

Rare vintage photograph of an Onna-Bugeisha, one of the female warriors of the upper social classes in feudal Japan (emerged before Samurai)

An onna-bugeisha (女武芸者?) was a type of female warrior belonging to the Japanese upper class. Many wives, widows, daughters, and rebels answered the call of duty by engaging in battle, commonly alongside samurai men. They were members of the bushi (samurai) class in feudal Japan and were trained in the use of weapons to protect their household, family, and honor in times of war. They also represented a divergence from the traditional “housewife” role of the Japanese woman. They are sometimes mistakenly referred to as female samurai, although this is an oversimplification. Onna bugeisha were very important people in ancient Japan. Significant icons such as Empress Jingu, Tomoe Gozen, Nakano Takeko, and Hōjō Masako were all onna bugeisha who came to have a significant impact on Japan.

(Source: retro-vintage-photography.blogspot.com)

Reblogged from darksilenceinsuburbia with 1,053 notes

starswaterairdirt:

Honour has come back, as a king, to Earth
The Dead
The Year’s at the Spring, 1920
illustrated by Harry Clarke

starswaterairdirt:

Honour has come back, as a king, to Earth

The Dead

The Year’s at the Spring, 1920

illustrated by Harry Clarke

Reblogged from alexanderraban with 514 notes

Reblogged from husskie with 6,250 notes

songesoleil:

The charmer.1911.
Art by John William Waterhouse.

songesoleil:

The charmer.1911.

Art by John William Waterhouse.

Reblogged from lepuslunar with 19 notes

xo-skeleton:

A Fool’s Life, 2010, by Mathew Weir
Oil on canvas mounted on board, 54 x 40.5 cm.

xo-skeleton:

A Fool’s Life, 2010, by Mathew Weir

Oil on canvas mounted on board, 54 x 40.5 cm.

Reblogged from alexanderraban with 32 notes

Reblogged from hexoplexo with 2 notes

snowce:

Mark Rothko, Untitled, 1949

snowce:

Mark Rothko, Untitled, 1949

(Source: tamburina)

Reblogged from wowgreat with 3,848 notes